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JSTOR and Aaron Swartz

JSTOR (pronounced JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of more than a thousand journals, dating back to 1665 in the case of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. More than 7,000 institutions in more than 150 countries have access to JSTOR. Most access is by subscription, but some old public domain content is freely available to anyone, and in 2012 JSTOR launched a program of free access to some further articles for individual scholars and researchers who register.

Of course, this archive does not contain the complete JSTOR. It contains 18,592 articles from the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. These are normally sold for around 10-20$ each. See the enclosed readme for more details.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Swartz

Aaron Swartz was was an internet activist. He believed tha information should be free. He co-authored the RSS 1.0 spec. He released about 20% of the PACER database of US Federal Court Documents. He set up a laptop in a utility closet at MIT and downloaded 35GB of the JSTOR archive.

Clearly he was a great risk to society. The feds arrested him. If he had been found guilty, he could have faced up to 50 years in prison, and a $4 million dollar fine. Wrap you head around that.

Two days ago, Aaron Swartz was found hung in his apartment.

Let’s keep this alive in his memory.

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